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World war 2 ration books

World war 2 ration books

Name: World war 2 ration books

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Every American was issued a series of ration books during the war. The ration books contained removable stamps good for certain rationed items, like sugar, meat, cooking oil, and canned goods. A person could not buy a rationed item without also giving the grocer the right ration stamp. On 8 January bacon, butter and sugar were rationed. This was followed by successive ration schemes for meat, tea, jam, biscuits, breakfast cereals, cheese, eggs, lard, milk, and canned and dried fruit. Tires were the first item to be rationed by the OPA, which ordered Civilians first received ration books—War Ration Book Number.

When people wanted to buy some food, the items they bought were crossed off in their ration book by the shopkeeper. What were the first food items to be rationed? On 8 January , bacon, butter and sugar were rationed. Some foods such as potatoes, fruit and fish were not rationed. Find great deals on eBay for WWII Ration Book in Collectible WW II Home Front Items. Shop with confidence. During the Second World War, you couldn't just walk into a shop and buy as much War ration books and tokens were issued to each American family, dictating 2 - The orders of the Office of Price Administration will designate the stamps to.

WWII ration books provide name, address, age, occupation, and even height and weight. Search this index of over war-time records (with images). 11 Mar - 1 min - Uploaded by The Novium Highlight from the museum collection. Over the past few years I have collected a number of leaflets, pamphlets, and books produced by the Ministry of Food around and during World War 2. For more about these books, see WW2 Ration book Q&A (). War Ration Book Four. United States of America Office of Price Administration. Read before. BBC Primary History - Children of World War 2 - Food and shopping. Beside a ration book are one person's rations for a week - including four rashers of.

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